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There's also interviews with Brendan at the links below about the Roswell reunion as well as The Night Shift.
“I get to look back on all the mistakes I made in terms of how I handled things … you were just a child, there’s a certain level of maturity and experience you don’t have,” Fehr mused. “Looking back on it, it’s taught me how to be a better actor in terms of being professional and appreciating what you have… We were so young — just as a cast, we were all learning at the same time, and if we had been in the place we are now, it would’ve been different. I don’t have any regrets, but I think we all know that we’ve matured in some way that it would be a much more interesting experience — it would be easier on some levels.”
The ATX Television Festival staged a 15-year anniversary reunion of The WB’s Roswell on Sunday. Stars Shiri Appleby, Jason Behr, Brendan Fehr, Majandra Delfino and Nick Wechsler were reportedly there, along with creator Jason Katims. The sci-fi series debuted 1999 and ran for three seasons (the last on UPN) before getting axed due to soft ratings in 2002.
"You look ahead, but you’ve gotta learn to enjoy what you have. And then, when your kids get older, you look back. I’m at that point, especially with Roswell. It was a milestone. It wasn’t the biggest show in the world, but it was popular. It was loved. I had a lot of fun on it. I wish I had the same attitude and temperament about it then, as I do now."
"Not so much. They talked to a guy about it a little bit. Not too much for me. It is bunch of different people that Jeff Judah had in mind. I think a combination of about 2 or 3 people. I remember talking to this one guy. He was a medic in the army. You asked about one thing, and his face just changed and you could tell there was something inside his head; you could see in his eyes. That was so real to him that imprinted on him on his brain, his heart, his soul, so powerful. With the military aspect, as much fun as we have with that, we definitely try to honor that to the best of our ability. Because the sacrifices these men did are so huge, I don’t think you can wrap your brain around it unless you are over there. We do our best to try to honor that to the best of our ability."

Q) How did you prepare for this role? A) I did a lot of research. I read a lot about military medics and a lot of the stories of Army medics. They all seem to be cut from the same kind of cloth and the most intriguing part was the guys that were shooting at them trying to kill them ten minutes before they’d be trying to save their lives. When you saw someone after the fire fight is done, when you see someone suffering and dying, as a medic your job is to save their life. You might save their life and then have them arrested. It was just their whole M.O., what they lived for was to make sure their brothers were safe and cared for until the very end. They’ll put themselves in harms way to do it. It really creates a solid foundation to build a character from who has a lot of character and a lot of integrity. It was a great start. I read a lot of military books and a few medical books. Trained Big John McCarthy for some MMA, which was a lot of fun.
"I will say no to any kind of movie or anything like that, only because I don't have the imagination to see where that character is," Fehr explained of being hesitant to return to the fan-favorite role of Michael. "I'm not sure I can get back in his head that way. Because my youth and inexperience played such a big part in that role, that after getting married and having three kids, you're like, 'Can I put myself back in that headspace and find that?' I think I could, but I've never gone down that path. So I can't see it, just because of lack of imagination more than anything else. But it would be interesting to see what others think.